Finra zeroes in on money-laundering cases

Regulator settled 49 AML-related cases in 2012, up 36%

Jan 6, 2013 @ 12:01 am

By Dan Jamieson

Brokerage firms are feeling the heat for lax anti-money-laundering procedures.

Last year, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Inc. settled 49 cases against broker-dealers and individuals in enforcement actions that included violations of anti-money-laundering rules.

That total represented a 36% increase from the 36 AML-related cases concluded in 2011, according to a review of Finra case records by InvestmentNews.

Legal observers expect that Finra will continue bringing AML charges against firms and individuals.

“This focus on AML issues has been a sustained enforcement effort by Finra,” said Sylvia Scott, a partner at Freeman Freeman & Smiley LLP and a former Finra enforcement attorney. “In my dealings with Finra, I'm encountering numerous inquiries in this area.”

The 2012 case total is partly the result of a continuing Finra sweep begun in 2010 focusing on firms that provide direct market access to large investors, many of them overseas.

FOREIGN FINDERS

“Finra is concerned about firms with customers using master/subaccount relationships where the subaccounts may actually have different beneficial owners,” Ms. Scott said.

Another AML-related enforcement priority last year was foreign finders, she said.

Foreign finders refer clients to U.S. brokerages for a fee and are a particularly risky area for money laundering.

At its annual compliance conference in May, Finra highlighted foreign finders, master/subaccounts, direct-access firms, penny stock transactions and suspicious-activity monitoring among its top priorities for its exams.

All these areas carry risks for money laundering, the regulator said.

But some observers contend that the focus has gone too far.

“In my experience, Finra has been using AML as a "gotcha' and brings that claim whenever it [can],” said Mark Astarita, managing member of Beam & Astarita LLC.

But Mr. Astarita doesn't think Finra is paying more attention to AML violations now than in past years.

The increase in settlements “I think is just [Finra] picking up what should be minor violations and adding them to a complaint,” he said.

Many AML charges are brought in conjunction with other violations, which suggests that AML problems were discovered during routine audits, said Jeffrey Ziesman, an attorney at Bryan Cave LLP and a former deputy regional chief counsel at Finra.

“It appears that both AML and e-mail continue to be areas in which Finra finds ... violations during their exams,” he said.

Since 2002, Finra Rule 3310 has required broker-dealers to have a written anti-money-laundering program reasonably designed to achieve compliance with the Bank Secrecy Act of 1970.

INADEQUATE PROCEDURES

“Firms are required to identify [risks] and account for them in a formal program,” Mr. Ziesman said.

In enforcement cases, Finra often finds that firms don't have adequate procedures to catch suspicious activity, fail to implement or properly supervise an AML program, or fail to file activity reports with the Treasury Department.

With a specific rule on the books since 2002, “the feeling [at Finra is] that it's been long enough ... There's no reason for firms not to [be in compliance],” said Daniel Nathan, a partner at Morrison & Foerster LLP, who formerly was a Finra regional enforcement director.

In addition to having less patience with wayward firms, Finra examiners may have become better at spotting violations, he said.

Finra gave specific warnings in 2008, 2009 and 2010, when it highlighted AML compliance in its exam priority letters for those years.

The increase in cases last year was a bit of a surprise to some observers, as AML violations haven't been an exam priority since 2010.

“The lesson to learn is that just because [AML] is not in the exam priorities letter, it doesn't mean they won't get you for it,” Mr. Ziesman said.

djamieson@investmentnews.com Twitter: @dvjamieson

0
Comments

What do you think?

View comments

Recommended for you

Sponsored financial news

Upcoming Event

Apr 30

Conference

Retirement Income Summit

Join InvestmentNews at the 12th annual Retirement Income Summit - the industry's premier retirement planning conference.Much has changed - and much remains to be learned. Attend and discuss how the future is full of opportunity for ... Learn more

Featured video

INTV

Why some retirement plan advisers think Fidelity is invading their turf

InvestmentNews editor Frederick P. Gabriel Jr. and reporter Greg Iacurci talk about this week's cover story that looks at whether Fidelity Investments is stepping on the toes of retirement plan advisers.

Latest news & opinion

Speculation mounts on whether others will follow UBS' latest move to prevent brokers from leaving

UBS brokers must sign a 12-month non-solicit agreement if they want their 2017 bonuses.

Maryland jumps into fiduciary fray with legislation requiring brokers to act in best interests of clients

Legislation requires brokers to act in the best interests of clients.

8 apps advisers love for getting stuff done

Smartphone apps that advisers are using in 2018 to run their business more efficiently.

Galvin's DOL fiduciary rule enforcement triggers industry plea for court decision

Plaintiffs warned the Fifth Circuit that Massachusetts' move against Scottrade signaled that the partially implemented regulation can raise costs for financial firms.

Social Security underpaid 82% of dually entitled widows and widowers

Agency failed to tell survivors that they could switch to a higher retirement benefit later.

X

Hi! Glad you're here and we hope you like all the great work we do here at InvestmentNews. But what we do is expensive and is funded in part by our sponsors. So won't you show our sponsors a little love by whitelisting investmentnews.com? It'll help us continue to serve you.

Yes, show me how to whitelist investmentnews.com

Ad blocker detected. Please whitelist us or give premium a try.

X

Subscribe and Save 60%

Premium Access
Print + Digital

Learn more
Subscribe to Print