Survey reveals how to keep workers happy

Flexible schedules encourage employee loyalty, poll finds; what about nap rooms?

Jan 25, 2013 @ 1:34 pm

By Liz Skinner

Advisory firms looking to hold on to their best people may want to examine how flexible they are with their employees' schedule.

While the top two reasons employees are most likely to stay with their company are pretty obvious — higher salaries and better benefits — more than half of workers in a recent survey said flexible work schedules would encourage them to remain with their employer.

Indeed, about 51% said a flexible schedule would keep them at their company, according to the online survey, which was conducted by CareerBuilder LLC. Of the 3,900 respondents, 70% of workers said increasing their salary is the best way to keep them at their jobs. Close to 58% cited better benefits as an attractive sweetener.

Not surprising, half of those polled said increasing employee recognition, such as awards, cash prizes and company trips, would keep them at their company. Another 48% said asking employees for their feedback and acting on those suggestions would encourage them to stay, according to the survey.

"Being compensated well will always be a top consideration," said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "But we're seeing work-life balance, telecommuting options and learning opportunities outweigh other job factors when an employee decides whether to stay with an organization."

About one in four respondents said good perks are the way for employers to retain workers. Asked to name a single perk that would make their job better, 40% chose working half a day Fridays. One out of five cited a gym at the workplace as a solid inducement. Other popular perks included: ability to wear jeans, daily catered lunches, massages, a nap room, rides to and from work, a snack cart, a private restroom and on-site daycare.

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