Practice Management

Time management tips for advisers

Feb 17, 2013 @ 12:01 am

• -Block off time on your calendar for unusual but necessary tasks, such as preparing for an unexpected crisis.

• -Schedule highest priorities at the highest-energy part of the day — mornings for 80% of people.

• -Allocate more time for meetings and tasks than you expect to use.

• -Take a three- to five-minute break after every 25 minutes of focused work to rest the brain.

-Read e-mails and other messages only once — deal with it, delegate it or delete it.

• -Create a list of three or four must-do items each day, and have another list of tasks that get added when time allows.

-Break larger projects into steps and schedule those on the calendar.

• -Delegate more and train staff to keep advisers on task.

-Ask clients to seek help from other staff members for questions that aren't advice-related.

• -Invest in a coach who can help advisers set priorities.

• -Be willing to say no, even to clients.

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