Janus shares dropped most in 15 months in 4Q on investor withdrawals

Subpar performance prompted investors to pull money for the 18th consecutive quarter.

Jan 23, 2014 @ 1:13 pm

Janus Capital Group Inc., owner of the Janus, Intech and Perkins funds, fell the most in almost 15 months after subpar performance prompted investors to pull money for the 18th consecutive quarter.

Janus's clients withdrew a net $6.2 billion, the most since the second quarter of 2010, the company said Thursday in a statement reporting fourth-quarter financial results. Janus shares fell 7.5% to $12.01 by 11:36 a.m. in New York trading, after earlier falling as much as 8.8%, the most since Oct. 31, 2011.

“Lagging relative investment performance remains the primary head wind to fund flow and performance fee improvement,” Daniel Fannon, an analyst at Jefferies & Co., wrote in a note to clients Thursday, adding that the withdrawals were almost triple his $2.3 billion estimate.

Janus reported that net income rose 23% to $38.3 million, or 21 cents a share in the three months ended Dec. 31, from $31.2 million, or 17 cents, a year earlier.

(Bloomberg news)

0
Comments

What do you think?

View comments

Recommended for you

Sponsored financial news

Featured video

Events

How 401(k) advisers can use 'centers of influence' to grow their business

Leveraging relationships with accounting, benefits, and property and casualty insurance firms can help deliver new business leads for retirement plan advisers.

Latest news & opinion

UBS continues to cut loans to recruits, while increasing compensation to brokers

The wirehouse reduced recruitment loans 20% and increased bonus loans 68% in the first quarter.

Things are looking up: IBDs soared in 2017

With revenue up, interest rates rising and regulation easing, IBDs are soaring.

SEC advice rule may give RIAs leg up over broker-dealers

Experts say advisers will be able to point to their role as fiduciaries as a differentiator in the advice market.

Brokers accept proposed SEC rule on who can call themselves an adviser

Some say the rule will clear up investor confusion, but others say the SEC didn't go far enough.

SEC advice rule: Here's what you need to know

We sifted through the nearly 1,000-page proposal and picked out some of the most important points.

X

Hi! Glad you're here and we hope you like all the great work we do here at InvestmentNews. But what we do is expensive and is funded in part by our sponsors. So won't you show our sponsors a little love by whitelisting investmentnews.com? It'll help us continue to serve you.

Yes, show me how to whitelist investmentnews.com

Ad blocker detected. Please whitelist us or give premium a try.

X

Subscribe and Save 60%

Premium Access
Print + Digital

Learn more
Subscribe to Print