Tech that boosts business value

Jan 29, 2014 @ 12:01 am

By Michael Laks

Financial advisers become successful by focusing on building their practices — not by planning how they'll leave them. In fact, less than one-third of today's RIA practice owners have a succession plan in place.

As registered investment advisers get older (the average age of RIAs is 58), this issue is becoming more important. Failing to plan means leaving money on the table when it comes time to retire.

In this short video, Tim Welsh, President of Nexus Strategy, a consulting firm to the wealth management industry, outlines the importance of succession planning and why having a technology infrastructure in place can boost your business value — both now and as you plan for retirement.

Interested in learning more about technology strategies for your organization? Download our new trend report Technology Strategies of Top Tier RIAs and start planning your future today.

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