Why more advisers aren't running for office

Running for political office comes with risks for advisers, but also has an upside for the financial advice business

Feb 24, 2014 @ 12:45 pm

More financial advisers will have to become politicians in order for financial planning to become established as a true profession that is licensed and regulated by law, according to Paul H. Auslander, who currently serves as the president of the Financial Planning Association of Florida.

In this video, InvestmentNews Editor Frederick P. Gabriel Jr. talks to Mr. Auslander about how running for office comes with risks for advisers, but can contribute a better public understanding of financial issues. For more on advisers as politicians, see this week's cover story on that topic and read Mr. Auslander's blog.

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