The way you think about contingency planning is about to change

Get a sneak peek at our upcoming feature on what happens to clients when their adviser is suddenly out of the picture

Jul 23, 2014 @ 1:03 pm

By Frederick P. Gabriel Jr.

Let's face it, drafting a contingency plan that allows your practice to go on without you isn't fun — or easy.

If it were, more than 20% of financial advisers might actually have an executable contingency in place.

On July 28, the way you think about contingency planning is going to change. That's because InvestmentNews will feature a personal look at what happens to clients when their adviser suddenly drops out of the picture. We'll also introduce you to one very special financial adviser who, when faced with the prospect of an imminent death, is making sure his clients won't be left in the lurch. For a preview of this special report on succession and contingency planning, watch the above video, and stay tuned for our full feature on Monday.

0
Comments

What do you think?

View comments

Recommended for you

Sponsored financial news

Featured video

Events

How 401(k) advisers can use 'centers of influence' to grow their business

Leveraging relationships with accounting, benefits, and property and casualty insurance firms can help deliver new business leads for retirement plan advisers.

Latest news & opinion

Things are looking up: IBDs soared in 2017

With revenue up, interest rates rising and regulation easing, IBDs are soaring.

SEC advice rule may give RIAs leg up over broker-dealers

Experts say advisers will be able to point to their role as fiduciaries as a differentiator in the advice market.

Brokers accept proposed SEC rule on who can call themselves an adviser

Some say the rule will clear up investor confusion, but others say the SEC didn't go far enough.

SEC advice rule: Here's what you need to know

We sifted through the nearly 1,000-page proposal and picked out some of the most important points.

Cadaret Grant acquired by private-equity-backed Atria

75-year-old owner Arthur Grant positions the IBD for the 'next 33 years.'

X

Hi! Glad you're here and we hope you like all the great work we do here at InvestmentNews. But what we do is expensive and is funded in part by our sponsors. So won't you show our sponsors a little love by whitelisting investmentnews.com? It'll help us continue to serve you.

Yes, show me how to whitelist investmentnews.com

Ad blocker detected. Please whitelist us or give premium a try.

X

Subscribe and Save 60%

Premium Access
Print + Digital

Learn more
Subscribe to Print