IRS raises 2018 contribution limit for qualified plans to $18,500

Phase-out ranges for IRA and Roth IRA contributions also raised

Oct 19, 2017 @ 12:00 pm

By InvestmentNews

The Internal Revenue Service has raised the contribution limits for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans to to $18,500 in 2018, up from the current limit of $18,000.

The IRS also increased the income ranges for determining eligibility to make deductible contributions to traditional individual retirement accounts, contribute to Roth IRAs and claim the saver's credit.

For single taxpayers covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $63,000 to $73,000, up from $62,000 to $72,000, the IRS said in a release. For married couples filing jointly, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is $101,000 to $121,000, up from $99,000 to $119,000.

For an IRA contributor who is not covered by a workplace retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple's income is between $189,000 and $199,000, up from $186,000 and $196,000. For a married individual filing a separate return who is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the phase-out range is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $120,000 to $135,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $118,000 to $133,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $189,000 to $199,000, up from $186,000 to $196,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

The income limit for the saver's credit — also known as the retirement savings contributions credit — for low- and moderate-income workers is $63,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $62,000; $47,250 for heads of household, up from $46,500; and $31,500 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $31,000.

The limit on annual contributions to an IRA remains unchanged at $5,500. The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000. Also unchanged, at $6,000, is the catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans, as well as the federal government's Thrift Savings Plan.

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