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Mary Beth Franklin

Contributing Editor

Mary Beth Franklin

Mary Beth Franklin is a contributing editor at InvestmentNews. As a nationally recognized expert in Social Security claiming strategies, she is also a frequent public speaker. With a background as a Capitol Hill reporter and a former retirement and tax editor at a national magazine, Mary Beth writes regularly about the latest research and thought leadership on retirement income planning. In her free time she likes to garden, ski, play the piano and travel with her recently retired husband. Her book, “Maximizing Your Clients’ Social Security Retirement Benefits,” is available for purchase.

Recent Articles

Social Security claiming strategy short-circuited by excess earnings

Jul 23, 2015

Both older nonworking wife and younger employed husband can lose benefits

I took the test, I talked the talk. Now you can call me a CFP!

Jul 21, 2015

Broader work experience definition allows columnist to use designation

Social Security as a backup plan for single filers

Jul 14, 2015

Claim early if you need to; suspend later if you can afford it

Same-sex couples inch closer to full Social Security benefits

Jul 9, 2015

Attorney General implements Supreme Court ruling throughout government.

Billy Joel: Poster child for the Viagra college fund?

Jul 8, 2015

Older dads can trigger Social Security benefits for young children

Latest trends in the retirement income market

Jul 7, 2015

Capturing rollovers, satisfying income seekers in low-interest rate environment

Social Security update for gay couples

Jul 2, 2015

Legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide opens the door for spousal, survivor, disability and Medicare benefits

Growing consumer demand for health care and Social Security advice

Jun 24, 2015

Report shows an opportunity for advisers with this expertise

Tackling the challenge of 401(k)s for small businesses

Jun 22, 2015

A new plan design and technology aims to expand access, reduce costs

Majority of Americans flunk Social Security quiz

Jun 12, 2015

Seventy-one percent falsely believe that full retirement age is still 65

More by Mary Beth Franklin »