What to expect on the regulatory front in 2018

Senior reporter Mark Schoeff Jr. speaks with IAA president and chief executive Karen Barr about what's to come now that the SEC has a full commission, including how the agency might progress on its fiduciary rule

Jan 2, 2018 @ 12:15 pm

By Mark Schoeff Jr.

The Securities and Exchange Commission enters 2018 with five members for the first time in more than two years. Now at full strength, the agency should be able to better pursue Chairman Jay Clayton's agenda, according to Karen Barr, president and chief executive of the Investment Adviser Association.

In this podcast, Ms. Barr also talks about the likely direction of the SEC's and Labor Department's efforts on a fiduciary rule for investment advice.

She also assesses how Washington handled one of its most tumultuous years in recent memory, and how the politics of 2018 may influence legislation and regulations affecting advisers.

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