SALT cap will affect nearly 10.9 million people

Treasury inspector general estimates those taxpayers have a total of $323 billion in state and local tax bills they won't be able to deduct

Feb 26, 2019 @ 4:32 pm

By Bloomberg News

About 10.9 million people are losing out on one of their most prized tax breaks — the deduction for state and local taxes.

That's the number of people the U.S. Treasury inspector general for tax administration estimates had tax bills above the $10,000 deduction cap included in the 2017 tax overhaul. The law limited the amount of state and local taxes — or SALT — that taxpayers can write off, a change most acutely felt in high-tax states including New York, New Jersey, Maryland and California, where tax bills can easily exceed the threshold.

(More: Limited deduction rubs SALT into taxpayer wounds)

These taxpayers collectively have $323 billion in state and local tax bills that can't be deducted, according to the report released Tuesday. The limitation has caused a series of bill introductions in Congress from New York and New Jersey lawmakers seeking to reinstate the full SALT deduction.

The report comes as taxpayers are in the middle of filing their returns to the IRS for the first time under the new tax law. In addition to the SALT deduction limit, many taxpayers are also finding that their refunds are smaller than anticipated because of changes in withholding throughout the year.

President Donald J. Trump met with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo earlier this month about revising the SALT cap. Mr. Trump earlier this month had said he was "open to talking about" changes to the provision, but offered no assurances he would back any SALT changes.

Eight governors have formed a coalition to fight the SALT cap, but the outlook in Congress isn't favorable. Senate Republicans have already said they will not revisit the issue.

(More: New tax laws invite strategic sidestepping)

0
Comments

What do you think?

View comments

Most watched

INTV

Young advisers envision a radically different business in five years

Fintech and sustainable investing are two factors being watched closely by some of the 2019 class of InvestmentNews' 40 Under 40.

INTV

Schwab's Jeff Kleintop: Prep for volatility given China trade uncertainties

China could be considered a developed market in five to seven years , according to Jeff Kleintop, chief global investment strategist, Charles Schwab.

Latest news & opinion

Funding for Reg BI, other SEC advice reform efforts denied in Waters amendment

House likely to approve measure that effectively kills rule package, but it faces uphill battle in Senate

Wall Street lashes out at Sanders' plan to pay off student debt with a securities trading tax

Financial pros argue that a transaction levy will hurt mom-and-pop investors along with investment houses.

GPB paid B-Ds and reps steep commissions to sell troubled private placements

GPB paid commissions of 9.3%, or $167 million altogether, on the firm's private placements.

Give us a break, active managers say

Seven portfolio managers share their outlooks for the rest of the year, generally agreeing that it's been hard for active managers to stand out.

GPB Capital reports decline in value of two biggest funds

One has dropped by 25.4% and the other by 39%, according to the company.

X

Hi! Glad you're here and we hope you like all the great work we do here at InvestmentNews. But what we do is expensive and is funded in part by our sponsors. So won't you show our sponsors a little love by whitelisting investmentnews.com? It'll help us continue to serve you.

Yes, show me how to whitelist investmentnews.com

Ad blocker detected. Please whitelist us or give premium a try.

X

Subscribe and Save 60%

Premium Access
Print + Digital

Learn more
Subscribe to Print