CFA 2014: Why nixing money manager conflicts of interest is key to restoring investor trust

Only 1/3 of investors see providers acting in their best interest

By Trevor Hunnicutt

May 6, 2014 @ 2:44 pm (Updated 3:08 pm) EST

The CFA Institute, which grants the chartered financial analyst designation, has been pushing for the financial services industry to put an increased emphasis on ethics to rebuild the confidence of retail investors. They've also recommended more disclosure of broker compensation to promote better investor outcomes.

In a Google Hangout on the sidelines of the institute's annual conference in Seattle this week, Suzanne Duncan, global head of research for the Center for Applied Research at State Street Corp., told InvestmentNews reporter Trevor Hunnicutt that only one third of investors believe their financial service provider is acting in their best interest.

The CFA Institute, which grants the chartered financial analyst designation, has been pushing for the financial services industry to put an increased emphasis on ethics to rebuild the confidence of retail investors. They've also recommended more disclosure of broker compensation to promote better investor outcomes.

In a Google Hangout on the sidelines of the institute's annual conference in Seattle this week, Suzanne Duncan, global head of research for the Center for Applied Research at State Street Corp., told InvestmentNews reporter Trevor Hunnicutt that only one third of investors believe their financial service provider is acting in their best interest.

  @IN Wire

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